Liquid Rules: The Delightful and Dangerous Substances That Flow Through Our Lives

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt #ad - Just as in stuff matters, mark Miodownik’s unique brand of scientific storytelling brings liquids to life in a captivating new way. We encounter fluids within the plane—from hand soap to liquid crystal display screens—and without: in the volcanoes of Iceland, the frozen expanse of Greenland, and the marvelous California coastline.

We come to see liquids with wonder and fascination, and to understand their potential for death and destruction. Sometimes explosive, occasionally poisonous, often delicious, but always interesting: the New York Times best-selling author of Stuff Matters show us the secret lives of liquids: the shadow counterpart of our solid “stuff.

Liquid Rules: The Delightful and Dangerous Substances That Flow Through Our Lives #ad - We know that we need water to survive, and that a cup of coffee or a glass of wine can feel just as vital. But do we understand how much we rely on liquids, heartbeats, Liquid Rules offers readers a tour of these formless substances, told through the language of molecules, or their destructive power? Set on a transatlantic flight, droplets, and ocean waves.

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Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World

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Mariner Books #ad - In stuff matters, miodownik explores the materials he encounters in a typical morning, from the steel in his razor to the foam in his sneakers. Full of enthralling tales of the miracles of engineering that permeate our lives, Stuff Matters will make you see stuff in a whole new way. Stuff matters is about hidden wonders, the astonishing properties of materials we think boring, banal, and unworthy of attention.

. It's possible this science and these stories have been told elsewhere, but like the best chocolatiers, Miodownik gets the blend right. New york times Book Review  . New york times bestseller • new york times notable book 2014 • Winner of the Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books “A thrilling account of the modern material world.

Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World #ad - Wall street journal "miodownik, a materials scientist, explains the history and science behind things such as paper, glass, chocolate, and concrete with an infectious enthusiasm. Scientific americanwhy is glass see-through? what makes elastic stretchy? Why does any material look and behave the way it does? These are the sorts of questions that renowned materials scientist Mark Miodownik constantly asks himself.

Miodownik studies objects as ordinary as an envelope and as unexpected as concrete cloth, uncovering the fascinating secrets that hold together our physical world.

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Periodic Tales: A Cultural History of the Elements, from Arsenic to Zinc

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HarperCollins e-books #ad - Periodic Tales: A Cultural History of the Elements, from Arsenic to Zinc #ad - Award-winning science writer hugh Andersey-Williams offers readers a captivating look at the elements—and the amazing, little-known stories behind their discoveries. Periodic tales is an energetic and wide-ranging book of innovations and innovators, of superstition and science and the myriad ways the chemical elements are woven into our culture, history, and language.

In the spirit of a short History of Nearly Everything comes Periodic Tales. It will delight readers of genome, Longitude, Einstein’s Dreams, and The Age of Wonder.  .

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Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine

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Abrams Press #ad - It could be an oddball researcher’s genius insight, a new breakthrough technology, a catalyzing moment in geopolitical history, or an unexpected but welcome side effect discovered during clinical trials. This is a deep, wide-ranging, and wildly entertaining book. Behind every landmark drug is a story. Piece together these stories, as thomas Hager does in this remarkable, century-spanning history, and you can trace the evolution of our culture and the practice of medicine.

Ten Drugs: How Plants, Powders, and Pills Have Shaped the History of Medicine #ad - Beginning with opium, 000 years, the “joy plant, ” which has been used for 10, Hager tells a captivating story of medicine. His subjects include the largely forgotten female pioneer who introduced smallpox inoculation to Britain, the first antibiotic, statins, the first antipsychotic, which saved countless lives, Viagra, the infamous knockout drops, which helped empty public mental hospitals, and the new frontier of monoclonal antibodies.

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The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - The disappearing spoon masterfully fuses science with the classic lore of invention, investigation, and discovery -- from the Big Bang through the end of time. These fascinating tales follow every element on the table as they play out their parts in human history, and in the lives of the frequently mad scientists who discovered them.

The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements #ad - Though solid at room temperature, gallium is a moldable metal that melts at 84 degrees Fahrenheit. A classic science prank is to mold gallium spoons, serve them with tea, and watch guests recoil as their utensils disappear. From new york times bestselling author sam Kean comes incredible stories of science, mythology, medicine, and more, history, finance, the arts, as told by the Periodic Table.

Why did gandhi hate iodine i, but it's also a treasure trove of adventure, betrayal, 31 the go-to element for laboratory pranksters? The Periodic Table is a crowning scientific achievement, 88 nearly ruin Marie Curie's reputation? And why is gallium Ga, 53? How did radium Ra, and obsession.

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Caesar's Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - With every breath, you literally inhale the history of the world. On the ides of march, julius caesar died of stab wounds on the Senate floor, but the story of his last breath is still unfolding; in fact, 44 BC, you're probably inhaling some of it now. Without it, you would die in minutes. Of the sextillions of molecules entering or leaving your lungs at this moment, German mustard gas, particles exhaled by dinosaurs or emitted by atomic bombs, some might well bear traces of Cleopatra's perfumes, even remnants of stardust from the universe's creation.

Tracing the origins and ingredients of our atmosphere, steered human progress, powered revolutions, Kean reveals how the alchemy of air reshaped our continents, and continues to influence everything we do. It's invisible. Lively, witty, and filled with the astounding science of ordinary life, Caesar's Last Breath illuminates the science stories swirling around us every second.

Caesar's Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us #ad - The guardian's best science Book of 2017: the fascinating science and history of the air we breathe. It's ever-present. In caesar's last breath, new york times bestselling author sam kean takes us on a journey through the periodic table, and across time to tell the story of the air we breathe, which, around the globe, it turns out, is also the story of earth and our existence on it.

And it has an epic story to tell. Along the way, witness the most important chemical reactions humans have discovered, we'll swim with radioactive pigs, and join the crowd at the Moulin Rouge for some of the crudest performance art of all time.

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Napoleon's Buttons

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TarcherPerigee #ad - These molecules provided the impetus for early exploration, and made possible the voyages of discovery that ensued. The molecules resulted in grand feats of engineering and spurred advances in medicine and law; they determined what we now eat, drink, and wear. With lively prose and an eye for colorful and unusual details, Le Couteur and Burreson offer a novel way to understand the shaping of civilization and the workings of our contemporary world.

Napoleon's buttons is the fascinating account of seventeen groups of molecules that have greatly influenced the course of history. A change as small as the position of an atom can lead to enormous alterations in the properties of a substance-which, in turn, can result in great historical shifts.

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Symphony in C: Carbon and the Evolution of Almost Everything

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - A science news favorite book of 2019An enchanting biography of the most resonant—and most necessary—chemical element on Earth. Carbon is everywhere: in the paper of this book and the blood of our bodies. Where did earth come from? what will ultimately become of it—and of us? With poetic storytelling, earth scientist Robert M.

Hazen reveals that carbon’s grand symphony began with a frenzied prelude shortly after the dawn of creation, bringing new attention to the tiny number of Big Bang–created carbon atoms that often get overlooked. At once ubiquitous and mysterious, carbon holds the answers to some of humanity’s biggest questions.

Symphony in C: Carbon and the Evolution of Almost Everything #ad - . Hazen explores the universe to discover the past, present, and future of life’s most essential element. We’re not only “made of star stuff, ” as Carl Sagan famously observed, but “Big Bang stuff, ” too. It’s with us from beginning to end, present in our baby clothes and coffin alike. With prose that sparkles like a diamond, Symphony in C tells the story of carbon, in which we all have a part.

We live on a carbon planet, and we are carbon life. His book then unfolds in four movements, Fire, building momentum as he explores carbon as the element of Earth, Air, and Water. He visits the famed volcanic crater Solfatara di Pozzuoli near Naples, where venting carbon dioxide and other noxious fumes condense into beautiful crystals.

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Elemental: How the Periodic Table Can Now Explain Nearly Everything

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Abrams Press #ad - If you want to understand how our world works, the periodic table holds the answers. In addition to this, he answers questions such as: what is the chemical symbol for a human? what would happen if all of the elements were mixed together? Which liquid can teleport through walls? Why is the medieval dream of transmuting lead into gold now a reality?Whether you're studying the periodic table for the first time or are simply interested in the fundamental building blocks of the universe—from the core of the sun to the networks in your brain—Elemental is the perfect guide.

When the seventh row of the periodic table of elements was completed in June 2016 with the addition of four final elements—nihonium, tennessine, moscovium, and oganesson—we at last could identify all the ingredients necessary to construct our world. In elemental, chemist and science educator tim James provides an informative, entertaining, and quirkily illustrated guide to the table that shows clearly how this abstract and seemingly jumbled graphic is relevant to our day-to-day lives.

Elemental: How the Periodic Table Can Now Explain Nearly Everything #ad - James tells the story of the periodic table from its ancient Greek roots, when you could count the number of elements humans were aware of on one hand, to the modern alchemists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries who have used nuclear chemistry and physics to generate new elements and complete the periodic table.

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Skeleton Keys: The Secret Life of Bone

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Riverhead Books #ad - In this delightful natural and cultural history of bone, what they do inside us, Brian Switek explains where our skeletons came from, and what others can learn about us when these artifacts of mineral and protein are all we've left behind. Bridging the worlds of paleontology, and forensics, medicine, anthropology, Skeleton Keys illuminates the complex life of bones inside our bodies and out.

Bone is as embedded in our culture as it is in our bodies. Switek makes a compelling case for getting better acquainted with our skeletons, in all their surprising roles. It gives your body its shape and the ability to move. Arguably, no other part of the human anatomy has such rich scientific and cultural significance, both brimming with life and a potent symbol of death.

Skeleton Keys: The Secret Life of Bone #ad - Our species has made instruments and jewelry from bone, put our faith in skull bumps as guides to human behavior, treated the dead like collectors' items, and arranged skeletons into macabre tributes to the afterlife. A provocative and entertaining magical mineral tour through the life and afterlife of bone.

Wall street journal Our bones have many stories to tell, if you know how to listen. Bone is a marvel, an adaptable and resilient building material developed over more than four hundred million years of evolutionary history. It grows and changes with you, an undeniable document of who you are and how you lived.

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The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code

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Little, Brown and Company #ad - Kean's vibrant storytelling once again makes science entertaining, explaining human history and whimsy while showing how DNA will influence our species' future. They can even allow some people, because of the exceptional flexibility of their thumbs and fingers, to become truly singular violinists. They prove that neanderthals and humans bred thousands of years more recently than any of us would feel comfortable thinking.

The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code #ad - . From new york times bestselling author Sam Kean comes incredible stories of science, history, and music, language, as told by our own DNA. In the disappearing spoon, bestselling author Sam Kean unlocked the mysteries of the periodic table. In the violinist's thumb, he explores the wonders of the magical building block of life: DNA.

There are genes to explain crazy cat ladies, why other people have no fingerprints, and why some people survive nuclear bombs. Genes illuminate everything from JFK's bronze skin it wasn't a tan to Einstein's genius.

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